City Break: Copenhagen

If you know anything about me, it’s that I love a good city break. A quick getaway to a new city is an adventure I can never pass up. Most recently, I was in Copenhagen, the capital city of Denmark. I’ve rounded up a few of my recommendations for things to do while in Copenhagen.

I highly recommend purchasing the Copenhagen Card while you’re in the city. It offers unlimited travel and free entry to most of the attractions I’m about to list. Seriously worth it!

Arrival

Now, I’m a languages girl – studied Spanish, lived abroad, and learning German on Duolingo. But, Danish is completely different to any languages I learned at school, so thank goodness that most people in Denmark speak English. At the airport, I activated my Copenhagen Card, securing me free train travel to our hotel.

This is where Google Maps and EU Data Roaming pretty much saved me. First, I ended up on the wrong platform, and nearly on a train to Sweden! That would have been bad, if not for me double checking Google and then confirming with a guard on the platform.

We stayed at Hotel Loven which was pretty much in the centre of everything – we could see Tivoli Gardens out the window and knew that the city centre was just a short walk away. It was a pretty basic room but the hotel offered communal kitchen facilities, which was perfect for travelling on a budget. Our first few hours were spent drawing up an itinerary, and then off we went to explore the city.

Royal sights

Copenhagen has a rich royal history, and the city is peppered with castles and palaces that each offer a unique story.

Famous for its guards, Amalienborg palace is a must-visit destination for anyone with the slightest interest in royal history. The palace itself houses a museum which takes you back through 150 years of Europe’s royalty, back to the Danish king Christian IX and Queen Louise. They were known as “the in-laws of Europe” because four of their children ascended to the thrones of England, Greece, Russia and Denmark. Entry to the museum is free with the Copenhagen Card.

Amalienborg

Plan your trip to coincide with the changing of the guard ceremony, which takes place every day at 12 noon. They march through the streets of Copenhagen and reach the main square at Amalienborg at 12, so make sure you’re there to watch the intricate dance as the new guards take over from the old watch.

Rosenborg castle

Set in the beautiful King’s Garden, Rosenborg castle features over 400 years worth of art, royal regalia and the crown jewels. The splendour of the throne room is a huge attraction, and the interiors of the castle are generally well-preserved, giving you a glimpse into royal life. Down in the vaults, you can see the crown jewels of Denmark. They’re behind glass though, so no trying on allowed!

Now home to the Danish Parliament, Supreme Court and Ministry of State, the stunning Christiansborg palace holds over 800 years of history in its walls. You can walk through the Great Hall where huge tapestries adorn the walls, depicting 1000 years of Danish history. Check out the historical ruins below, too. The Copenhagen Card will get you free entry.

Historical Copenhagen

Nyhavn is possibly one of the most iconic spots in Copenhagen. The old commercial port is now a hotspot for tourists to enjoy a cold beverage as the sun sets, or eat at a local restaurant by the waterside. Famous author, Hans Christian Andersen spent over twenty years living in Nyhavn by the port. Many of the buildings are originals that have been refurbished and are now excellent restaurants serving fresh seafood and traditional Danish meals.

Offering fantastic views over the city, Rundetaarn (or, the round tower) is well worth the climb. After a great leg work out, walking in a spiral of about 209m, you’ll find yourself at the top of the still-functioning observatory – the oldest one still in use in Europe. Inside, the library hall is often home to art exhibitions, but it used to be Hans Christian Andersen’s favourite haunt.

Fans of HCA’s fairytales shouldn’t missed the Little Mermaid statue, or Den Lille Havfrau in Danish. The bronze statue has been sitting on a rock at the Langelinie promenade since 1913 and is a popular tourist spot for fans of the story. There is also a museum dedicated to the author, which is ideal for families to visit. Experience a walk-through of Hans Christian Andersen’s life and some of his most popular tales.

Den Lille Havfrau

Lovers of rollercoasters, rejoice! Tivoli Gardens is one of the world’s oldest theme parks and is open for business so thrill-seekers can enjoy themselves. Plus, they hold a regular fireworks display that you can easily watch from other areas of the city. The Copenhagen Card gets you free entry, but remember to splash out for the rides pass!


Copenhagen was the last trip abroad I took before the Covid-19 pandemic so it holds a special place in my heart. Once things get back to normal and people feel safe about travel again, I’d highly encourage you to visit and taste a crisp beer, smorrebrod and the rich history of Denmark’s capital city.

The Best UK Road Trips

The coronavirus pandemic has really put a spanner in the works for most people’s summer holiday plans. Tourism and travel are expecting record low visitors, especially for travel abroad. As a travel blogger, this does have me worried – already I’ve had three trips cancelled. But better safe than sorry!

The UK government is now hoping that our infection rate R will be low enough by the summer for some hospitality services to reopen. So, with that in mind, here are some UK travel ideas, including beauty spots and roadtrips galore.

Cheddar Gorge, Somerset

Set within the Mendip Hills in Somerset, Cheddar Gorge was England’s top road trip according to Click4Reg who found the location was tagged almost 60,000 times on Instagram. At 400 feet deep and nearly three miles long, this collection of cliffs is well worth a visit.

Lake District

One of the most beautiful lakes in the world, Britain’s largest National Park and World Heritage Site in Cumbria was tagged over 2 million times on Instagram, according to data from Faraway Garden Furniture. It’s a spectacular beauty spot in the UK and makes for an ideal walking holiday or day trip.

IMAGE CREDIT: Daniel Kay

Hardknott Pass was rated as one of England’s top road tripping destinations, too. So, kill two birds with one stone by visiting this stunning nature site, while also experiencing an exciting journey.

Peak District

This National Park spans across Derbyshire, Cheshire, Greater Manchester, Staffordshire and Yorkshire, so if you live in any of these areas count yourself lucky to have such a stunning spot on your doorstep. As well as being a top walking destination, according to data commissioned by Click4Reg, two popular road trips cross through this site.

READ MORE: The most beautiful lakes in the world

Snake Pass, was hashtagged over 12,000 times on Instagram. The road links cities in Greater Manchester and North Yorkshire and is often used by commuters. But it still ranks highly as a destination in its own right, especially for cyclists and driving enthusiasts. Woodhead Pass was less popular, with just under 2,000 hashtags. This route is a major A road, but utterly beautiful as it passes through the Pennines.

New Forest

Home to ponies galore, the New Forest in Hampshire is a nature lover’s dream. Featuring winding forest trails, points of historical interest and rare species of birds and mammals. It’s also one of only three parks in the UK that is still governed by verderers, who keep an eye on the fair usage of the park as a grounds for cattle grazing. If you’re keen to encounter animal life during your nature walks, then this is the perfect place for you.

IMAGE CREDIT: Chris Button

London to Bristol

The Great West Way is an iconic 125 mile drive that will take you from central London to the vibrant city of Bristol, with tons of historic points of interest along the way. I’ve driven this route myself and it’s difficult to concentrate on the road when you’re faced with such epic scenery, like Windsor Castle and Stonehenge. If you’re not up to driving such a long way in one day, you can plan a short tour with stops in different towns along the way – but perhaps wait until the pandemic subsides a little bit. In the meantime, you can take a virtual tour instead.

Somerset to Cornwall

If you’re based in the South West and looking for a scenic coastal and countryside route, then the Atlantic Highway is ideal. The entire route spans three counties – Somerset, Devon and Cornwall – and would take almost 8 hours. While in lockdown, even though it’s eased slightly, it’s difficult to justify that kind of mileage. So consider taking short day trips along the route. You’ll see the best of British countryside, while being able to visit some major cities and landmarks.

READ MORE: Exploring Exeter, Devon

Once the pandemic subsides and tourism picks up again, it’ll be worth travelling the whole route, stopping off in different towns along the way. You’ll get a mixture of stunning rural scenes, like Exmoor National Park, and breezy coastal views, especially once you hit Cornwall. Plus, you can visit the westernmost point of the UK’s mainland: Land’s End.

A beach view of Land’s End

READ MORE: A trip to Falmouth, Cornwall

Even if the hospitality sector doesn’t reopen, you might be lucky enough to live nearby one of these spots for a day trip. Pack your own lunch and away you go!

Please be sure to check before you travel as many of these parks will still be closed. Please do not immediately flock to our open spaces. Maintain social distancing as much as you can.

5 Things to See and Do in Exeter

The capital city of Devon, Exeter, is a tourist and financial hub (to an extent) in the South West. If you’re looking to holiday in the UK this Summer, the South West is always popular. To help you decide where to go, I’ve put together a handy guide to Exeter, so that you can maximise your time.

Continue reading 5 Things to See and Do in Exeter

Exploring Budleigh Salterton

Struggling with your UK holiday destination? With Brexit looming, fewer Brits are choosing EU locations for the summer holidays. Beyond Europe, many families will be priced out of a summer holiday abroad this year, but for a pebbly seaside retreat, we need look no further than the South Devonian Coast.

Continue reading Exploring Budleigh Salterton

Travel Tips: Last-Minute Packing

I am a disorganised traveller. Having grown up as a British Airways staff-traveller, booking holidays last-minute has become second-nature. Worse still, packing for week-long holidays the night before we were due to fly became customary. My most recent trip abroad saw me scrambling on a Friday night, trying to pack everything away in time for a flight on Saturday morning.* So, with that in mind, I want to share some of my top packing tips for disorganised or busy travellers; let me paint you a picture…

Continue reading Travel Tips: Last-Minute Packing

5 Spanish Stereotypes

Stereotypes Which I’ve Found To Be Totally True

1. Siestas. For about three hours every day, most shops are closed to enjoy lunch and an afternoon chit-chat session. The exceptions are the bigger, international brands like Primark and Zara, which tend to remain open, but are usually pretty quiet. In terms of banks and public services, though, forget about it – once they’re closed for siesta, they rarely reopen.

2. Mañana culture is real. So real. Don’t expect anything to get done for deadline unless you ask for it three weeks in advance. On the other hand, if you don’t get things done by the deadline they’ve set, expect all hell to break loose.

3. Fiestas. Spain has tons of fiestas. If a city is celebrating a fiesta, all rules are broken. For example, drinking on the streets is illegal most of the year, but during fiesta days the botellon culture takes over. And I love it. Because even though people drink on the streets, they aren’t getting drunk the way us Brits do on holiday; Spain’s relationship with alcohol is, dare I say, healthy.

4. Spanish Speaking Speed. Spanish people speak so, so quickly. Especially if they think you can speak Spanish too. They’ll run with it and you’ll just have to smile and nod.

5. Iberian Passion. While the Spanish people I’ve met haven’t necessarily been short tempered, they’ve all had their moments of passion. Whether it’s over heating bills or The Lion King, when they’re particularly invested in something, they really fight for it. Honestly, it’s fantastic to see such conviction in one’s beliefs.